There Are 3 Coaching "Archetypes" - Here's How Each One Should Be Getting Leads

Ever wonder why a marketing strategy that seems to work really well for other coaches just doesn't work for you at all?

Well, there's a reason for that. And it's not because you suck.

Coaches come to me all the time asking where to find potential clients. And the truth is, there are a lot of different strategies that can work.

But depending on your personality type, some of them are going to work better for you then others.

In this week's video, I walk you through the three coaching archetypes and show you the best lead generation tactics for each type.

Check it out:

Summary

There are three coaching archetypes. While you may recognize yourself as belonging to more than one category, there is usually one that comes most naturally to you. Knowing your primary archetype can help you play to your strengths and protect against your weaknesses.

(These archetypes are based on Malcom Gladwell's research in his book The Tipping Point. I've applied them to the coaching industry and suggested the best marketing strategies for each.)

Here they are:

Archetype #1 - The Connector

  • Tendencies: Asking questions, bringing people together
  • Strengths: Curiosity, making people feel comfortable and understood
  • Weaknesses: Developing and selling their own ideas can be a challenge
  • Examples: Oprah, Lewis Howes
  • Tactics: Networking, referral partnerships, interviewing other experts

Archetype #2 - The Maven

  • Tendencies: Research and synthesize information, create new ideas
  • Strengths: True expertise, giving people specific strategies and teaching
  • Weaknesses: Echo chamber, afraid to sell, ironically doubt their competence the most
  • Examples: Jenny Blake, George Kao
  • Tactics: Workshops/webinars, detailed content (blog posts, videos, books), thought leadership through concepts and systems

Archetype #3 - The Salesperson

  • Tendencies: Persuading, telling stories, adding sizzle to the steak
  • Strengths: Charisma, making ideas sticky, accessible, and compelling
  • Weaknesses: Overlooking the importance of connections, delivering what they promise
  • Examples: Marie Forleo, Tony Robbins
  • Tactics: Workshops/webinars, sales letters and videos, offering free strategy sessions

Once you've discovered your archetype, the best thing to do is play to your strengths. Double down on the things that you are naturally good at and don't try to master the strategies you're not as good at. Instead, partner up with coaches, contractors, and colleagues who can balance out your weaknesses.

Note: If you're still not sure which archetype you are, be sure to check out this article from Charlie Gilkey and this one from Pamela Slim. I found both of them to be really helpful.

Greg Faxon

Greg Faxon, 2829 Connecticut Avenue NW (Apt 513), Washington, DC 20008, United States