Journal Entry: Week 10 (How To Avoid Ever Being Ghosted By A Potential Client)

This week I fell into the classic trap of getting “ghosted” by a potential coaching client.

And the reason is because I broke my own rule.

In this week’s journal entry, I’m going to tell you what I did wrong and more importantly, how you can avoid ever having a potential client disappear on you.

Let’s get into it…

What happened this week:

Put out an offer on social media.

My goal this week was to book 5 calls with potential clients. I used this strategy from Jonathan Goodman to put together a simple post on Facebook and Instagram:

After posting, I immediately had one person fill out the app and I gave him a call. We talked about what he was looking for and how my program could help him. It was out of his price range and I was able to leave the call with a clear No (I actually prefer this to a Maybe - you’ll see why below).

Had someone ghost on me. I also got a message on Instagram from someone who didn’t quite fit the description in the offer but was still interested: a pretty fit younger guy who wanted to lose some fat (not 15-30 pounds) and gain more muscle. We ended up scheduling a time to talk and had a great conversation. But honestly, I didn’t think he would be willing to invest in a program like this.

But he wanted to think about it and let me know. Since he didn’t have a sense of his schedule, he asked if he could text me later that day. I always end up regretting times like this when I’m not able to schedule the follow up call before hanging up. Sure enough, I didn’t hear back from him.

My protocol for this is to send one message checking in casually, another message letting him know that I’m okay that they decided not to sign up and asking for feedback, and then I close the loop on it mentally.

Started creating a welcome sequence. Last week, I launched the new website and created a habit tracker that people could opt-in for. This week, I created the first two automated emails that will go out once people download the tracker - this will build a relationship with new subscribers, encourage them to actually print out and use the habit tracker, and eventually lead them to apply for a strategy session.

What I learned this week:

There seems to be demand for a low end offer. I worked with my first 5 clients for 90 days at $500 per month. This worked really well for clients who had a lot of weight to lose, a lot of built up frustration, and needed multiple coaching calls in order to change their habits. After some of my recent conversations, it’s clear that there’s a significant group of people who would make great clients at a lower price point. I’m working on putting together an offer that takes less of my time and allows me to serve people on an ongoing monthly basis for around half the price.

You always have to be careful about adding a low end offer too early on, as it can become a crutch that stops you from holding firm with those who really would benefit more from more support. On the other hand, it can be used very effectively both as an on-ramp for new clients and as an off-ramp for existing ones.

I enjoy doing focused work in the mornings and calls in the afternoon. One of the things that I’ve really appreciate about starting this new business is how little time I’m spending on calls. I’ve been working from a local coffee shop in the mornings, which helps me get out of the house and be more productive. I really value this independent creative time and plan on maintaining this schedule going forward. It’s easy for me to get burnt out when I’m on calls all day.

What I'll focus on next week:

Finish the welcome sequence. I’m hoping to finish up the automated sequence for new subscribers next week so that I have that in place when I start driving more traffic to the website. Then I have to figure out where I want that traffic to come from. I’ll likely use a combination of guest blogging and Facebook/IG ads.

Sign up for a live event. One of the best things I did when I started gregfaxon.com was to go to paid, curated events. The truth is that it’s much easier to build trust in person while you’re building up your online presence. Plus, it helps avoid the isolation that can happen when you run an online business.

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If you want to read my past journal entries, I've listed them all here for you: